UCMJ Articles

The Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) is the bedrock of military law. The UCMJ is a federal law, enacted by Congress. The UCMJ articles define in detail specific outlawed offenses and their repercussions for service members.

 

UCMJ Article 78: Accessory After the Fact

The accused must have had knowledge of the crime committed and must have done something to benefit the offender AFTER the crime was committed.  The benefits could range from something as simple as offering the offender a “safe place to stay” to something as complex as assisting the principal in destroying evidence. Learn More

 

UCMJ Article 79: Conviction of Offense Charged, lesser Included Offenses, and Attempts

Conviction of Offense Charged, Lesser Included Offenses, and Attempts- Article 79 of the UCMJ includes an array of charges that may be divided into four …Learn More

 

UCMJ Article 80: Attempts

A service member may be charged with a violation of Article 80 if they intentionally attempted to commit a crime that was executed unsuccessfully. Learn More

 

UCMJ Article 81: Conspiracy

The objective of the conspiracy must be a violation of the UCMJ and the act itself must be an incident separate from the agreement. The offense may or may not be criminal, but it must be a result of the agreement between the parties involved. Learn More

 

UCMJ Article 82: Soliciting Commission of Offenses

According to the MCM, a service member may be subject to prosecution under Article 82 if they solicit or give advice regarding an offense outlined in the UCMJ. Learn More

 

UCMJ Article 83: Malingering

In order to be prosecuted for Malingering, a service member must have purposely committed an act or acts that directly resulted in their not being able to fulfill their military responsibilities or expectations. Learn More

 

UCMJ Article 84: Breach of Medical Quarantine

There is a difference between a service member being confined to quarters and being under medical quarantine. A service member who has been ordered into a medical quarantine was ordered to do so due to their possible exposure to a communicable contagion. Learn More

 

UCMJ Article 85: Desertion

Desertion is completed when the service member leaves their unit, organization, or place of duty without authority and with the intent to remain away permanently. Changing their mind and returning in a timely manner is not a defense. Learn More

 

UCMJ Article 86: Absence Without Leave

Absence Without Leave (AWOL) in the military is addressed under Article 86 of the UCMJ. The scope of Article 86 covers any case not addressed in another Article in which a service member is, through the service member’s own fault, not at the place where the member…Learn More

 

UCMJ Article 87: Missing Movement; Jumping From Vessel

In order to be convicted of a violation of Article 87, the prosecution must prove beyond a reasonable doubt the accused was absent during “a move, transfer, or shift of a ship, aircraft, or unit involving a substantial distance and period of time.” Learn More

 

UCMJ Article 112a: Wrongful Use, Possession, etc. of Controlled Substances

Drug offenses in the military are addressed under Article 112a of the UCMJ. According to the article itself, “Any person subject to this chapter who wrongfully uses, possesses, manufactures, distributes, imports into the customs territory of the United States… Learn More

 

UCMJ Article 120: Rape and Sexual Assault Generally

A service member of the United States Armed Forces who rapes, sexually assaults, or physically abuses or threatens to abuse another person with sexual contact, groping or unwanted sexual advances will be charged under Article 120 of the UCMJ. Learn More

 

UCMJ Article 120b: Rape and Sexual Assault of a Child

A military member who rapes, sexually assaults, or physically abuses or threatens to abuse a child under the age of 16 years old will face charges under Article 120b of the UCMJ. Learn More

 

UCMJ Article 120c: Other Sexual Misconduct

Crimes related to sexual misconduct that do not fall under the categories of sexual assault or rape are prosecuted under Article 120c of the UCMJ. A military member accused of voyeurism, taping and distributing pornography, indecent exposure, or forcible pandering, will be subject to prosecution under Article 120c of the UCMJ. Learn More

 

UCMJ Article 128: Assault

Military crimes that involve attempts or the completed act of bringing unlawful violence upon another person are charged as assault under Article 128 of the UCMJ. Learn More

 

UCMJ Article 133: Conduct Unbecoming an Officer and a Gentleman

Conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman in the military is addressed under Article 133 of the UCMJ. According to the article itself, “There are certain moral attributes common to the ideal officer and perfect gentleman, a lack of which is indicated by acts of dishonesty, unfair dealing, indecency, indecorum, lawlessness, injustice, or cruelty. Learn More

 

UCMJ Article 134: Adultery

Adultery in the military is addressed under Article 134 of the UCMJ, also known as the “General Article,” which is a list of prohibited conduct that is of a nature to bring discredit upon the armed forces or is prejudicial to good order and discipline. Learn More

 

UCMJ Article 134: Fraternization

Fraternization in the military is addressed under Article 134 of the UCMJ, also known as the “General Article,” which is a list of prohibited conduct that is of a nature to bring discredit upon the armed forces or is prejudicial to good order and discipline. Learn More

 

See a full list of UCMJ Articles or learn more about UCMJ and how it applies to varies branches and members of the military.